How a button’s value proposition affects revenue Experiment ID: #647

Online for Life

Experiment Summary

Timeframe: 6/10/2014 - 7/22/2014

The general donation button on Online for Life’s website had always communicated a value proposition beyond simply giving a gift. The buttons message of “Save a Baby” communicated what their gift accomplished. However, we wanted to test whether this button copy was the best way to communicate both value and the purpose of the subsequent page.

Research Question

Which language on the donate button most clearly communicates the unique value proposition of Online for Life?

Design

C: Save a Baby
T1: Save a Child
T2: Give

Results

Treatment Name Revenue per Visitor Relative Difference Confidence Average Gift
C: Save a Baby $1.64 $20.18
T1: Save a Child $2.66 62.2% 100.0% $33.67
T2: Give $1.14 -30.5% 100.0% $23.11

This experiment was validated using 3rd party testing tools. Based upon those calculations, a significant level of confidence was met so these experiment results are valid.

Flux Metrics Affected

The Flux Metrics analyze the three primary metrics that affect revenue (traffic, conversion rate, and average gift). This experiment produced the following results:

    0% increase in traffic
× 2.8% decrease in conversion rate
× 66.8% increase in average gift
62.2% increase in revenue

Key Learnings

The “Give” button resulted in 41% less conversions and a 30.5% decrease in revenue. Removing the value proposition from the button ended up significantly reducing the visitors likelihood to give.

On the other hand, expanding the audience beyond just “Save a Baby” to “Save a Child” increased revenue by 62.2%. This simple change reminded donors of the long term impact of their gift. We save want to save a baby from abortion because of who they will become over time.


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Experiment Documented by...

Tim Kachuriak

Tim is the Chief Innovation & Optimization Officer at NextAfter. If you have any questions about this experiment or would like additional details not discussed above, please feel free to contact them directly.