How adding a phone number field to an acquisition form impacts conversion Experiment ID: #7567

Care Net

Experiment Summary

Timeframe: 9/15/2017 - 10/4/2017

Care Net offers an online course called, Pro-Life 101. When someone signs up for the course, the form has fields where they provide personal information. Getting a phone number from a new name is very valuable to the organization. They wanted to test if the conversion rate of the page would be impacted if they asked for a person’s phone number.

Research Question

Would adding a phone number to the acquisition process impact conversion?

MECLABS Conversion Factors Targeted

C = 4m + 3v + 2( i - f) - 2a ©

Copyright 2015, MECLABS

Design

C: No Phone Number
T1: Added Phone Number Field

Results

Treatment Name Conv. Rate Relative Difference Confidence
C: No Phone Number 99.6%
T1: Added Phone Number Field 62.9% -36.9% 100.0%

This experiment has a required sample size of 1 in order to be valid. Since the experiment had a total sample size of 1,454, and the level of confidence is above 95% the experiment results are valid.

Flux Metrics Affected

The Flux Metrics analyze the three primary metrics that affect revenue (traffic, conversion rate, and average gift). This experiment produced the following results:

    0% increase in traffic
× 36.9% decrease in conversion rate
× 0% increase in average gift

Key Learnings

Adding a phone number field to the acquisition form decreased conversion by 36%. Even though the field wasn’t required, the perceived perception of having this field on the form caused cognitive friction to the acquisition process resulting in a significant amount of people abandoning the form and not signing up for the online course.


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Experiment Documented by...

Courtney Gaines

Courtney is an Optimization Associate at NextAfter. If you have any questions about this experiment or would like additional details not discussed above, please feel free to contact them directly.