Not Valid How changing the value proposition on a donation page can impact overall revenue

Date Added: June 20, 2017
Research Partner: Harvest Ministries
Element tested: Donation Page Headline, Donation Page Copy

Harvest Ministries had a high-urgency campaign leading up to their large-scale evangelism event, Harvest America. On the donation page for the campaign, the value proposition and call-to-action was centered on making the event a success. It had more of a logistics angle to it. Because the event was an evangelism outreach, we hypothesized that people might be more motivated to give if the value proposition was focused on the spiritual impact. We developed a treatment and split the traffic coming to the donation page.



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Not Valid How using a countdown clock in an email appeal impacts donor conversion

Date Added: June 20, 2017
Research Partner: Harvest Ministries
Element tested: Email Design, Email Copy

Harvest Ministries had a high-urgency fundraising campaign prior to their  large-scale evangelism event, Harvest America. They sent a series of emails to their house file to acquire donations and revenue. In an effort to increase clicks and donations from their email, they added a countdown clock in their email counting down to the end of the campaign. This element was added to create a greater sense of urgency and motivate more people to click-through and give. They split their email file and sent the control email without the countdown clock and the treatment email with the countdown clock.



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22.2% lift How adding a personal testimony strengthens the value proposition and impacts clicks

Date Added: June 20, 2017
Research Partner: Harvest Ministries
Element tested: Email Copy

Harvest Ministries ran a high-urgency fundraising campaign leading up to a large-scale evangelism event, Harvest America. They sent a series of emails for the campaign to acquire donations and revenue. One of the emails they sent had a strong message about the eternal impact Harvest America has. In an effort to increase clicks to the donation page from the email, they tested putting a person’s testimony in the email copy. They split their file and sent the control without the testimony and the treatment with it.



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5.8% lift How a relevant subject line not only impacts opens, but clicks and donations

Date Added: June 20, 2017
Research Partner: Harvest Ministries
Element tested: Email Subject Line

Harvest Ministries had a high-urgency fundraising campaign leading up to a large-scale evangelism event, Harvest America. They sent a series of emails during this campaign to acquire donations and revenue. In an effort to increase the number of people who opened their emails and ultimately give, they tested a subject line of an email as they got closer to the campaign’s final day. The control used the subject line, “One Thing Remains” and the treatment tested something that was more timely, “This Sunday…”



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91.6% lift How site flow interruptor offers affect conversion on mobile devices

Date Added: June 16, 2017
Research Partner: Illinois Policy Institute
Element tested: Advertising

Illinois Policy Institute wanted to promote their new eBook, Madigan’s Rules to their website visitors. However, they wanted to match the right promotional tactic to the correct audience segment. They had previously tested slide-out offers and exit intent popups, but knew that the two tactics presented differently on mobile and desktop.

They did a split test between the two offers and closely monitored traffic and conversion from desktop visitors in contrast to traffic and conversion from mobile visitors to match the ideal “site flow interruptor” to to the optimal experience.



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49.9% lift How site flow interruptor offers affect conversion on desktop devices

Date Added: June 16, 2017
Research Partner: Illinois Policy Institute
Element tested: Advertising

Illinois Policy Institute wanted to promote their new eBook, Madigan’s Rules to their website visitors. However, they wanted to match the right promotional tactic to the correct audience segment. They had previously tested slide-out offers and exit intent popups, but knew that the two tactics presented differently on mobile and desktop.

They did a split test between the two offers and closely monitored traffic and conversion from desktop visitors in contrast to traffic and conversion from mobile visitors to match the ideal “site flow interruptor” to to the optimal experience.



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Not Valid How an empty thermometer affects donor conversion

Date Added: June 15, 2017
Research Partner: Hillsdale College
Element tested: Donation Page Design

Hillsdale College started their calendar year-end campaign with the intent to launch a thermometer on their donation page once they achieved a critical mass of donations toward their goal. Previous testing had shown that the ideal time to introduce a thermometer to maximize conversion was when the goal was at least halfway met. However, the team wondered if putting the empty thermometer on the page would disincentivize visitors from giving.

They launched a treatment with the empty thermometer and closely monitored the results to determine a winner.



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Not Valid How removing a premium offer affects conversion

Date Added: June 15, 2017
Research Partner: Hillsdale College
Element tested: Donation Page Design, Donation Page Copy

Hillsdale College offered premiums as incentives to donate for many of their free online courses. These premiums helped keep average gift high and made the courses generate donation revenue for the College.

But the team wondered if the premium ever got in the way of the donation. If the prospective donor was not interested in the premium offer, did they abstain from giving entirely? Were prospective donors confusing the offer with the incentive? They decided to test this on their course “The Presidency and the Constitution” by drafting a page that removed the premium book offer, in this case, their popular “Constitution Reader”.

They split traffic to the donation page and launched an A/B test to see how it affected revenue and donor conversion.



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125.9% lift How an open field on a donation form affects donor conversion rate

Date Added: June 6, 2017
Research Partner: CaringBridge
Element tested: Donation Page Form

CaringBridge had executed several tests on their main donation page and found that the motivation to give on that page was very different than on their “tribute” pages, which was where most of their revenue came in. Their main donation page had a high average gift, and the motivation to give had proven to be much less personal and much more mission-based.

Since average gifts were high on this page, they wondered if the six-button gift array (which had beaten a three-button array in a previous test) were actually hindering average gift and conversion. The suggested gift amounts were meant to provide relief to decision friction—but what if they added to it?

CaringBridge decided to test this array against an “open field”, which allowed the donor to decide on their own gift amount, with a stated minimum donation of $10. They split the traffic to determine which had a greater effect on donor conversion rate.



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91.1% lift How the placement of an inline offer impacts conversion

Date Added: June 6, 2017
Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation
Element tested: Advertising

On The Daily Signal website, we had been testing an inline direct ask for a donation. Given the high volume of traffic to the website, Heritage was seeing considerable revenue come from this offer. However, we began to be concerned about the visitor experience since the offer was interrupting the flow of the article.

We decided to test the impact of moving the donation ask to the bottom of the article and simply including an show inline sentence that would link to the bottom. Our belief was that even if the treatment saw no significant difference, it would be a win since it would improve the readers’ experience.



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