-56.9% drop How including the details of the plan decreased new donor revenue

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Americans for Prosperity Element tested: Email Copy, Email Call-to-Action

As a part of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) response efforts for Americans for Prosperity, they were running an acquisition offer which presented an Open Letter (essentially a petition) to Congress to not send bail out money to fiscally irresponsible states as a part of the recovery efforts. In reviewing the offer donation page, we decided to test whether or not including the details of the plan to use grassroots activists to stop this from happening would increase donor conversion rates and/or revenue.

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4.6% lift How a less formal version of a sender’s title impacts open rate

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate Element tested: Email Sender

The Missionary Oblates utilize the leader, Father David Uribe, as their primary sender. In general, they tend to use his formal title in their email envelop since that is what many Catholics are use to seeing. However, we had a hypothesis that a less formal sender name could increase opens so we decided to test that concept.

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Not Valid How asking active donors to be one of a few donors to give a specific amount impacted revenue during a matching gift campaign

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Email Copy

As a part of The Heritage Foundation's matching gift campaign (called "The Board Challenge"), we wanted to experiment with the ask amount and approach. Typically, the organization has used "make your best gift today" kind of language within their control copy. In an attempt to set a smaller, more reasonable target, we wanted to experiment with driving donors to be "one of just X donors we need today to make a gift of Y." The idea behind this is to (a) set a relevant ask amount for the donors, but also (b) allow them to see that they can help achieve a "small quantity" goal at that amount, as well.

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44.3% lift How asking non-donors to be one of a few donors to give a specific amount impacted donor conversion rate during a matching gift campaign

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Email Copy

As a part of The Heritage Foundation's matching gift campaign (called "The Board Challenge"), we wanted to experiment with the ask amount and approach. Typically, the organization has used "make your best gift today" kind of language within their control copy. In an attempt to set a smaller, more reasonable target, we wanted to experiment with driving non-donors to be "one of just X donors we need today to make a gift of Y." The idea behind this is to (a) set a relevant ask amount for the non-donors, but also (b) allow them to see that they can help achieve a "small quantity" goal at that amount, as well.

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30.5% lift How soliciting from a cultivation personality to a list they are not cultivating impacted donor conversion rate during a matching gift campaign

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Email Sender

The Heritage Foundation's Director of Membership has been cultivating a portion of the email house file for 9-months now, never having ever solicited the list directly. During this campaign, we wanted to see how the list he was cultivating would respond when he solicited. Furthermore, we also wanted to experiment with how using him as a solicitor would work for the portion of the list he was not cultivating, as well.

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41.9% lift How a more human subject line affects conversion rates

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: NextAfter Element tested: Email Subject Line

In this experiment, we were launching a free training course to help nonprofits improve their copywriting. The initial copy included a subject line that utilized sales-style tactics to try and win the open. But we wondered if a more humanized version of the subject line could lead to more opens - and possibly even more registrations.

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Not Valid How emotional appeal versus specific outcome affect open rates

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Bill of Rights Institute Element tested: Email Subject Line

Historically, much of BRI's subject lines have focused on stating the topic of the email without adding emotional context. From experiments with similar organizations, we have found that using emotional language can help prompt the action that we're striving for (such as opening or clicking on the email.) We wanted to test this same concept for BRI's audience.

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39.9% lift Will a shorter, more direct email lead to more clicks?

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: NextAfter Element tested: Email Copy, Email Call-to-Action

NextAfter's annual conference — the Nonprofit Innovation & Optimization Summit — moved to a virtual event due to COVID-19 but the change also further delayed the launch and promotion. For the first launch email, we wondered if a shorter, more to the point email may actually do better in driving clicks, engagement, and registrations (free and paid) as a lot of people on our list we (assume) know the event, know it's quality, and may even be expecting the announcement so we didn't need to spend as much time in the email explaining the event and sharing its value.

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76.2% lift How posing questions in your email impacts clickthrough rate

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Americans for Prosperity Element tested: Email Call-to-Action

As a part of promoting a new white paper for their subscribers, Americans for Prosperity was looking to distribute a relevant and new white paper produced by their team. In reviewing the control experience, we wondered if posing questions to inspire the reader to create demand for the white paper would increase email clickthrough rate.

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