40.4% lift How design impacts conversion on a long-form email acquisition page

Date Added: October 23, 2020 Research Partner: NextAfter Element tested: Name Acquisition Design

In this experiment, we were running a pre-sign up offer for a year-end fundraising training course. There was quite a lot of copy on the landing page to communicate the value and various components of the training. And we wondered if using design elements could help users understand the copy better and lead to more conversions.

View the experiment »


Not Valid How adding an “About Us” section to the landing page impacted donor conversion rate

Date Added: October 23, 2020 Research Partner: The Fund for American Studies Element tested: Name Acquisition Design, Name Acquisition Copy

As a part of promoting a new content offer, The Fund for American Studies wondered whether telling more about their organization's history would help boost email signups, but most importantly, whether or not it would increase the donor conversion rate after someone had signed up to request the resource they were offering.

View the experiment »


208.8% lift How increasing interest through an additional step in an acquisition funnel affects donor conversion

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Bill of Rights Institute Element tested: Name Acquisition Copy, Name Acquisition Form

BRI was running an offer for a quiz about Natural Rights. They also were running an offer for an eBook about Natural Rights. So we combined the two into a treatment; they were first offered the quiz and when they received their score they were offered the eBook. This did mean that we asked them to go through one more step and would potentially lose new names. However, we wanted to see if increasing the value of the offer through adding a quiz would increase donor conversion.

View the experiment »


Not Valid How adding additional clarity through the design affects registrations

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: NextAfter Element tested: Name Acquisition Design

Prior to this experiment, we had tested into using a time/date bar on the webinar registration page. It hadn't impacted conversion significantly, but led to less inquires and confusion about the actual start time of the webinar. In this experiment, we wondered if we could use design to bring additional clarity to not just the time and date of the webinar, but to some of the additional perks of registering including live Q&A time and access to a recording afterwards.

View the experiment »


396.2% lift How a pledge at the end of an article impacts email signup rate

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Advertising, Name Acquisition Copy, Name Acquisition Form

The Leadership Institute runs a daily news website called Campus Reform, where leaders can read articles that covers what is happening on college campuses related to free speech and education. With two subscription types (daily and weekly), there are a substantial number of visitors to this website each year. Readers are presented with opportunities to become a subscriber through a sticky bar at the foot of each article page that pops up when a visitor arrives on the website. But could we increase email subscribers by trying a different location?

View the experiment »


Not Valid How a different offer affects email acquisition

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: NextAfter Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline, Name Acquisition Copy

In this experiment, we had a list of attendees from an event we sponsored. We want more people to sign up for our own event, but ultimately, we just want to get them to opt-in to communication so we can develop a relationship. So we wondered...is it more effective to send this list an email about our conference and ask them to register for a free ticket? Or should offer them something of immediate value like a research study?

View the experiment »



56.6% lift How personalization on an instant donation page impacts donor conversion

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: EWTN Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline

EWTN promotes a Pro-Life Declaration using paid media on Facebook. On the confirmation page after a person signs the Pro-Life Declaration, they are also presented with an instant donation ask. We hypothesize that adding personalization to that page might help increase motivation to make a gift. To test this, we pushed their first name from the acquisition page to the instant donation page at the very top confirming that their name had been added. 



View the experiment »


9.3% lift How the length of a pledge impacts email conversion rate

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: KCBI Element tested: Name Acquisition Form

In an effort to acquire email addresses, KCBI created a pledge/petition for people to sign that aligned people's beliefs with a core value of theirs. The original pledge had ten statements of belief within it and we wondered if the number of beliefs statements would impact conversion.

Ultimately what we were trying to figure out is this, can a pledge have too many belief statements resulting in friction and therefore drop-offs?

We cut the number of belief statements from 10 to 5 for the treatment. We chose the 5 for the treatment based on what we thought were the most "consumable" for people - they weren't lengthy, weighted, and seemed easiest to understand, read, and align with.



View the experiment »


276.2% lift How adding clarity and specificity increased newsletter signups

Date Added: September 22, 2020 Research Partner: Buckner International Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline, Name Acquisition Copy

In looking at ways to acquire more email addresses through a global footer across our organization's website, we looked at the current value prop offered for our email newsletter signup. We saw an opportunity to provide additional language to increase specificity and exclusivity in order to get more people over to the newsletter subscription page and connected with updates from Buckner!

View the experiment »