18.4% lift How bringing clarity to a call-to-action impacts donor conversion

Date Added: October 24, 2018
Research Partner: Focus on the Family
Element tested: Advertising

On Focus on the Family's broadcast pages, they offer a daily resource for each broadcast. The button below the resource said, "Give Now". In a previous experiment we tested that button copy against copy that communicated what people would get when they would click the button. We used button copy that read: "Get the DVD Here". We were able to significantly increase traffic to the donation page with this tactic, but we actually decreased donor conversion. We hypothesized that with this approach people were expecting to just get their resource by clicking the resource button on that broadcast page and abandoned the donation page once they realized that in order to get the resource they had to make a gift to Focus. To build upon these learnings, we proposed bringing clarity to the buttons rather than the donation page so that we set the expectation prior to them getting to the donation page. To do this we ran a three way test: "Give Now" was the control, "Get Your Resource For a Gift of Any Amount Here" was the first treatment and "For a Gift of Any Amount, Get your Resource Here" was the second treatment.

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87.9% lift What impact does a matching gift have on donor conversion?

Date Added: October 23, 2018
Research Partner: Alliance Defending Freedom
Element tested: Email Copy, Email Call-to-Action, Donation Page Copy

Alliance Defending Freedom had a unique opportunity during their most recent high urgency campaign. They had secured a matching gift and the campaign they were running was being executed solely through email. This meant they could run an experiment to validate the impact of a matching gift without the risk of cross contaminating the control segment. (This can often happen if there are banner ads in addition to the email program which may cause subscribers in the control group to see messaging intended only for the treatment.) They decided to split their subscriber file (a random split for both donors and nondonors) and maintain this split for the initial messaging of the campaign. They then sent the control group campaign messaging but without the mention of a matching gift. For the treatment group, they used the same basic messaging but incorporated language about doubling their gift and a deadline to take advantage of the match. They wanted to understand the impact this tactic would have on overall conversion.

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144.0% lift How using a different delivery method for a content offer impacts name conversion rate

Date Added: October 22, 2018
Research Partner: EWTN
Element tested: Advertising

On the ChurchPop website, they offer people the opportunity to sign up for their eNewsletter. This offer is presented at the bottom of their website pages. With the high volume of mobile traffic on this website, we hypothesized that presenting the offer in a different way might increase email conversion. To do this, we developed a mobile slide up that presented the content offer. As a person would start to scroll on their phone, a pop-up would appear (slide up) from the bottom. We also hypothesized that making the offer look more like the page might make increase engagement. We did

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-13.5% drop The impact of providing the entire eBook on a landing page

Date Added: October 22, 2018
Research Partner: Care Net
Element tested: Name Acquisition Copy

We had read in Hubspot's blog that including the entire eBook on a landing page, with a dynamic CTA that follows the reader on the page, would increase conversion. We wanted to see if letting visitors "try before they buy" would increase the number of emails acquired. We decided to launch this test with Desktop traffic getting the entire eBook and mobile traffic getting only the first few pages. We ran the experiment for just over two weeks.

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21.4% lift How an end-of-article course signup opportunity affects conversion rate on a blog page

Date Added: October 22, 2018
Research Partner: Heartlight Ministries
Element tested: Advertising

Heartlight Ministries has a good amount of traffic that runs to their blog for parenting content and podcast links, so they wanted to test adding an opportunity to engage through an online course signup opportunity to the end of each blog post. This particular opportunity offered the Tough Guys and Drama Queens online course.

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30.3% lift Will asking people to pray before asking them to give inspire more generosity?

Date Added: October 22, 2018
Research Partner: Billy Graham Evangelistic Association
Element tested: Email Call-to-Action

During Hurricane Florence fundraising efforts, BGEA experimented with a direct ask vs. asking email subscribers to pray (before asking them to give a gift to support their Rapid Response Team's ministry efforts after the wreckage was cleared). This was the third email in a series of communications sent to the housefile. It had followed two prior emails that had made a direct solicitation of the file.

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169.3% lift How adding a premium to the instant donation page impacts donor conversion

Date Added: October 9, 2018
Research Partner: Boys Town
Element tested: Donation Page Copy

Boys Town offers an email series target at grandparents. They promote this offer through paid Facebook ads. The offer was acquiring new names at a great cost, but it wasn't converting donors very well on the instant donation page. In an effort to increase donor conversion on this page, they proposed adding a premium offer to the page for any donation $25 or more. The premium was a child's book that a grandparent could give to their grandchild. They tested this addition of a premium offer on the instant donation page against the donation page that didn't offer one.

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551.0% lift How presenting an offer inline with the content on a page impacts donor conversion

Date Added: October 9, 2018
Research Partner: EWTN
Element tested: Advertising

EWTN's Daily Readings page is one of the most visited pages on the EWTN website. On this page they feature the Daily Mass Readings and video. In an effort to convert the traffic from this page into names and even donors for EWTN, we hypothesized adding an offer at the end of the Daily Readings might convert these highly engaged people. To test this, we tried two different offers; one content offer - the Pursuing Holiness eBook, and the other a donation ask. The content offer linked to the eBook acquisition page and the donation offer linked to the EWTN primary donation page. We tested these two offers against the control that gave people an opportunity to give at the top of the Daily Readings page.

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8.2% lift How a longer, more rigorous survey affects email acquisition

Date Added: October 9, 2018
Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation
Element tested:

The Heritage Foundation was running their Annual Member Survey, which asked members for their opinions on key policy initiatives and then gave them the opportunity to give. The initial treatment for the survey came from the direct mail piece, which was a very basic survey that just asked members to check boxes with the policy initiatives they thought were important. This might have worked in direct mail, but digitally, this seemed very underwhelming to the Heritage team. They crafted a second survey that was much longer—asking multiple, nuanced questions for each policy area and leaving room for open-ended responses. They knew that this was risky—common wisdom says that many people don't know what to write in open-ended responses—but they thought that deeper engagement would result in higher conversion.

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81.9% lift How deeper survey engagement affects donor conversion

Date Added: October 9, 2018
Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation
Element tested: Name Acquisition Form

The Heritage Foundation was running their Annual Member Survey, which asked members for their opinions on key policy initiatives and then gave them the opportunity to give. The initial treatment for the survey came from the direct mail piece, which was a very basic survey that just asked members to check boxes with the policy initiatives they thought were important. This might have worked in direct mail, but digitally, this seemed very underwhelming to the Heritage team. They crafted a second survey that was much longer—asking multiple, nuanced questions for each policy area and leaving room for open-ended responses. They knew that this was risky—common wisdom says that many people don't know what to write in open-ended responses—but they thought that deeper engagement would result in higher conversion.

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