Not Valid How cognitive tension and the incentive of “free instant access” affects conversion rate

Date Added: November 30, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Design, Name Acquisition Copy

The Heritage Foundation's team of research scholars assembles an Index of Military Strength each year to assess the readiness of America's military and the strength of existing global threats. The team at Heritage promoted this on Facebook to acquire new email addresses. Their existing landing page made the offer to "get the facts", which had previously been a compelling incentive. They developed a treatment that leveraged proven keywords "get instant access". This was coupled with a new headline. Instead of aligning the offer to "get the facts", the treatment headline asked a question: "Is the US Military ready to defend our country?" This was designed to draw the reader into the copy and introduce tension that could be answered by activating the offer. The only variables tested on this treatment were the headline and call-to-action.

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87.2% lift How testing a new messaging approach affects conversion rate

Date Added: October 30, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design, Donation Page Headline, Donation Page Copy, Donation Page Form

As part of their membership campaign, The Heritage Foundation wanted to determine which messaging approach would be most appealing to their donors. At the start of the campaign, we created three landing page treatments based upon two new hypotheses of what the members would respond best to. Our current control version focused on the current situation in American politics and framed it around the negative aspects of the "establishment." Alternatively, we wanted to test a more positive tone using the same framework. The third treatment was a far more radical redesign using a more modern design that pointed to historical accomplishments and touted the benefits of membership.

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98.8% lift How a more personal subject line affects open rate

Date Added: October 8, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Email Subject Line

With a little more than two days left before the end of the year, Heritage Foundation email subscribers had received six different messages from Jim DeMint– the president of the organization– asking for their support with a year-end gift. Best practices suggest that the email signer should be the most publicly know leader of the organization, and should rarely (if ever) change to ensure donors hear a consistent voice. Heritage tested that theory by sending an email from someone else in the organization.

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21.7% lift How soliciting the donor’s opinion affects the gifts acquired

Date Added: September 16, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Form

The addition of the "gift designation" field ended up increasing the donations acquired by 20.8%. The addition of the field certainly caused additional friction for the donor but the value communicated by this field was more than enough to overcome it. The key to success in this experiment was the change in approach to the standard gift designation field found with many other donation forms. Instead of asking where the funds should be direct, which is a very organizationally-centric question, we asked the donors how Heritage should be spending its time. This empowered the donors to be able to state their opinion at a high level instead of a worrying about the tactical elements that it takes to implement the aspects. Additionally, a lift in the number of gifts was achieved in both steps of the process. The donation form makes an initial ask for the Heritage Foundation and then a subsequent ask for their sister organization, Heritage Action for America. The "gift designation" field produced a 12% lift to conversion on the initial form and an 82% lift to the subsequent form which is what resulted in 20.8% increase to the gifts acquired

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99.4% lift How a two-step form reduced affects cognitive friction and conversion

Date Added: September 10, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Form

For The Heritage Foundation's Presidents' Club Meeting registration, we wanted to find a way to increase the number of attendees to the event. Historically, the forms had all been a single page with all of the data capture fields required before someone could register. These fields included selecting each session they would like to attend and entering all of their information into the form. We had the hypothesis that if we moved the process to a two-step process, it would create less friction in the visitor's minds since the forms would be shorter. This two step process would also allow us to look up the donor's information (based upon their email address or ID) and use this to pre-populate the second form.  We were able to not only fill in their address information but also pre-select the sessions that their membership level qualified for.  We wanted to see if this process would lead to an increased number of completed registrations.

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Not Valid How the right message affects donor conversion

Date Added: August 14, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Headline, Donation Page Copy

As part of a capital campaign to raise funds for a new building, The Heritage Foundation wanted to be sure they were utilizing the most powerful value proposition available to them. Historically, fundraising messages had always been about what Heritage does each day to research and promote conservative values in Washington. This building campaign offered an opportunity to try a different tactic that might be even more appealing to donors. We created a treatment that promoted the benefits of the new building. This approach allowed us to talk about more tangible aspects such as proximity to the Capital and having a larger foot print.  We then launched the campaign and split traffic between the two options.

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172.8% lift How focusing on the product-level value proposition affects revenue

Date Added: August 5, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design, Donation Page Copy

The Heritage Foundation operates a political news organization called the Daily Signal. Part of the site has links back to the Heritage Foundation properties include a donation link found at the bottom of the page. Since the donors coming from the site may not be as familiar with The Heritage Foundation, we wanted to discover what value proposition would be most appealing to the donors. We decided to create two treatments, one that targeted the primary value proposition of giving to The Heritage Foundation and the other that focused on a product-level value proposition of giving to the Daily Signal.

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Not Valid How design and copy placement affects conversion rate

Date Added: July 3, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design

As part of an appeal for their Reclaim America campaign, The Heritage Foundation wanted to implement a landing page that used the same look and feel as the campaign's microsite.  This landing page was heavier on imagery than is traditionally used in their appeals so we wanted to ensure the design would be as effective as the standard design style. We created an experiment using a design from a previous campaign (with minor variations) as the control and the new microsite design as the treatment.  The copy and quotes used were identical between the two pages.

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-85.1% drop How changing the landing page design affects revenue

Date Added: July 3, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design

The Heritage Foundation had been using the same landing page design for their search engine marketing (SEM) donor campaigns for the past three years. During those three years, we had run multiple experiments on the main organizational donation page which had gradually evolved into something that looked completely different. We were in the process of moving the SEM page to the same domain as the main donation form and realized that it would be a good time to validate that the old design was still effective for the SEM audience segment.  We created an experiment by duplicating the page content but displaying it on the two different page designs.

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Not Valid How the placement of elements to add urgency affects conversion

Date Added: June 5, 2015 Research Partner: The Heritage Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design

Previous experiments had taught us the positive impact increasing urgency and progress toward a goal can have an a campaign. As part of a moneybomb campaign, The Heritage Foundation wanted to determine if the placement of the visual elements designed to promote these two factors would impact the donor conversion. For the campaign, we designed two landing pages: one with a thermometer at the top and a countdown clock at the bottom and another with these two visual elements flipped.

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