106.3% lift How extended value proposition email copy affects donor conversion

Date Added: November 15, 2017 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Email Copy

The Leadership Institute recently sent a letter to their subscribers about the ‘Normandy Coalition’ –a new group of conservative and liberty-minded student organizations, policy groups, and legal defense foundations. As they developed this email copy, they wondered: Will a substantially longer email that includes more stories, examples, and value proposition language, increase motivation and donor conversion? They created a treatment version of the email and launched an A/B test to find out.



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63.7% lift How authority, active language, and clarity affect email acquisition rate

Date Added: November 13, 2017 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Advertising

Leadership Institute recently re-launched a course about the history and principles of conservatism, called Conservatism 101. As they prepared to market this course through Facebook, they developed four different treatments for the advertisements. Testing proved that the third and fourth treatment produced a significant lift to clickthrough rate, but they wanted to gather more data to validate if one of these resulted in more downstream conversions—in this case, more sign-ups for the course. The primary difference in the two treatments was the image and the copy within. The first treatment had a patriotic background that described what the course was: "Conservatism 101: An Introduction to the American Conservative Tradition". The second, however, featured a picture of Mark Levin, a popular radio host and lecturer in the course. This image contained call-to-action copy as well: "Join Mark Levin in this new free course, Conservatism 101." The team isolated these two ads to determine which ad was more effective at driving downstream conversions.

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108.7% lift How emotional language, clarity and authority affect ad clickthrough rate

Date Added: November 10, 2017 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Advertising

Leadership Institute recently re-launched a course about the history and principles of conservatism, called Conservatism 101. As they prepared to market this course through Facebook, they developed several different treatments for the advertisements. The first treatment posed a question: "What are conservatives actually trying to conserve?", which implied that the course would answer that question. The second treatment introduced emotional language that outlined the threat to conservatism and made a call for conservatives to rediscover their principles. This treatment also included a call to action (CTA) in the top copy: "Start today by enrolling in Conservatism 101 now." The third treatment took a similar tack with emotional language, but sought to align with the mindset of the reader by declaring the threat to be invalid. This treatment heightened the clarity and authority around the course offer, introducing a list of featured speakers, and introduced line breaks to better isolate the CTA: "Activate your free course today and discover—or rediscover—the principles and beauty of conservatism." The final treatment used the same copy as the third treatment, but introduced a picture of Mark Levin with the CTA "Join Mark Levin in this new free course: Conservatism 101." Since Facebook is able to serve multiple ads simultaneously and gather data on each, they launched this A/B/C/D test to determine which ad produced the most clicks.

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132.1% lift How aligning a Facebook ad image with the interests of the target audience affects email acquisition rate

Date Added: November 7, 2017 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Advertising

The Leadership Institute recently re-launched their online course “Conservatism 101,” and began promoting to targeted audiences on Facebook. This course features a number of notable conservative leaders, including Mark Levin. They wondered: If we align the Facebook ad image with the audience interest target (i.e. fans of Mark Levin), can we increase our email acquisition rate?



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-39.5% drop How charged language performs in a subject line

Date Added: August 21, 2017 Research Partner: Leadership Institute Element tested: Email Subject Line

The Leadership Institute works with colleges to combat leftis bias on campus. They wanted to know if giving a sneak peak to the email by naming the college in the subject line would generate more clicks than a subject line that included charged language that riles up their donor base.

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