Not Valid How donor-centric copy affects email acquisition

Date Added: October 18, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline, Name Acquisition Copy

The National Breast Cancer Foundation was giving away a free eBook, What Every Woman Needs To Know during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They featured this eBook on their Breast Cancer Awareness Month page, with a form right on the page to download it. The team at NBCF hypothesized that using copy that addressed the reader directly would increase email acquisition rate. They created a treatment that personalized each element: rather than "Get the free breast health guide", the treatment offered the visitor the chance to "Get your free breast health guide". Additionally, they revised the paragraph copy to show how the content of the eBook allows the visitor to be proactive about their own health. Finally, they added the value proposition element of "free" into the call-to-action. They launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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14.6% lift How a third-party personal recommendation affects email acquisition rate

Date Added: October 18, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Design

National Breast Cancer Foundation created a free eBook called What Every Woman Needs to Know to give away during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They created a landing page to advertise this offer, which showed the cover of the book and presented a value proposition to download it. However, they developed a hypothesis that a personal recommendation from a woman, delivered through an image and a quote, would have more impact on a visitor's decision to download the eBook than the current image of the eBook. They designed a treatment featuring an picture of a woman and a personal quote in place of the eBook image, then launched an A/B test to see if it increased landing page conversion.

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50.2% lift How a single click affects email acquisition rate

Date Added: October 9, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Design

The National Breast Cancer Foundation had released a special eBook, What Every Woman Needs to Know, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They had set a goal of getting as many downloads as possible of this eBook during the month of October. In light of this goal, they had questioned whether they should make their Breast Cancer Awareness Month page the homepage for the month, since this page had a download form directly on the page. Their usual homepage featured the eBook in an image slider, but it required one more click to access the page to get the book. They decided to put this to the test. They launched an A/B test to see which page acquired more emails—in essence, quantifying the effect of the extra click that the homepage required.  

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15.8% lift How increased specificity in a subject line affects open rate

Date Added: October 4, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Email Subject Line

The National Breast Cancer Foundation sent an offer to a list of people who had signed up for their Early Detection Plan app. The offer was a free eBook called What Every Woman Needs To Know that included resources related to early detection of breast cancer. They decided to test subject lines on this email. The control subject line teased the outcome of the eBook: "Stay informed about your breast health". They hypothesized that being extremely clear about the offer, even in the subject line, might increase open rate since the list was so highly qualified. So they developed a treatment subject line: "A new early detection guide". They launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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