How offering something with a higher perceived value impacts name acquisition Experiment ID: #8546

FamilyLife

FamilyLife® has been committed to helping individuals find biblical help for their marriage and family relationships. Through the Weekend to Remember® marriage getaways, FamilyLife Today® radio broadcasts, The Art of Marriage® video event, and the many other resources and content, God has used FamilyLife to restore hope for millions of couples and transform their lives.

Experiment Summary

Ended On: 2/21/2018

FamilyLife wanted to take advantage of the traffic to their homepage for name acquisition. In order to increase conversion on the subscribe button at the top of their page, they tested offering the free online course instead of a general subscribe button. In both instances, the person was taken to a page to complete their email signup or course registration (depending on if they saw the control or the treatment) once they clicked the button. Design elements remained the same.

Research Question

Does offering something of value in a sticky bar increase email acquisition over a general subscribe header?

Design

C: General Subscribe
T1: I Still Do Offer

Results

Treatment Name Conv. Rate Relative Difference Confidence
C: General Subscribe 0.17%
T1: I Still Do Offer 0.25% 47.2% 99.3%

This experiment has a required sample size of 25,273 in order to be valid. Since the experiment had a total sample size of 96,120, and the level of confidence is above 95% the experiment results are valid.

Flux Metrics Affected

The Flux Metrics analyze the three primary metrics that affect revenue (traffic, conversion rate, and average gift). This experiment produced the following results:

    0% increase in traffic
× 47.2% increase in conversion rate
× 0% increase in average gift

Key Learnings

Offering the online course in the header increased acquisition by 47%. By offering the online course, we not only offered people something with a higher perceived value, but the copy brought clarity to what the offer was. These two factors increased the appeal of the offer and as a result more people were motivated to convert and get the offer.


Experiment Documented by...

Allison Jones

Allison is an Optimization Associate at NextAfter. If you have any questions about this experiment or would like additional details not discussed above, please feel free to contact them directly.