40.4% lift How new creative affects traffic in a Facebook ad campaign

Date Added: January 16, 2019 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Advertising

DTS was running a Facebook campaign to promote their free online course on the book of Revelation. They wanted to test new creative on the ad design that would bring clarity and a more eye-catching visual appearance to the ads, to encourage more people to visit the registration page. They tested two versions of the new design to see which one worked best.



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21.3% lift How creative affects conversion rate in a Facebook ad

Date Added: December 7, 2018 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Advertising

DTS launched a new online course on the books of Jonah & Ruth. They tested two forms of creative for the Facebook ad- one that had contrasting colors and one that was more simple with brighter white letters. They wanted to see which ad performed better in terms of course conversions. Copy remained the same on both.

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276.7% lift How elaborating on specific organizational initiatives affects clickthrough rate

Date Added: December 13, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Email Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary recently began their calendar year end campaign, focused three pillars: The Call to Teach, The Will to Engage, and The Heart to Go. As they prepared to send an appeal on email focused on the second pillar–The Will to Engage– they wondered if an email that elaborated on the strategic initiatives they've created to engage culture would increase the clickthrough rate to the donation page. They created a treatment version and launched an A/B test to find out.

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143.0% lift How framing offer content in a Facebook ad impacts email acquisition

Date Added: October 27, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Advertising

Dallas Theological Seminary was promoting their online course Revelation when they noticed an opportunity to test. In their original Facebook course promotion ad, they called on viewers to 'study with one of DTS' renowned professors, for free.' Through previous message testing, they've seen that this is a strong value proposition for a lot of their online resources and material. However, they wondered: Will a stronger focus on the book being studied (i.e. Revelation) and its complexity increase motivation and email acquisition rate? They launched an A/B test to find out.

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88.1% lift How urgency impacts email acquisition rate on a Facebook ad

Date Added: October 27, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline, Name Acquisition Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary was making preparations to launch its new 'mini' course on the life and work of Martin Luther. They wondered: If we tell visitors to pre-enroll in this course by stressing the urgency of the upcoming launch date, will email acquisition increase? They launched an A/B test leading up to their launch date to find out.  

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-33.0% drop How a ‘Campaign Opt-Out’ Link Affects Email Unsubscribe Rate

Date Added: September 13, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Email Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary was running a campaign for North Texas Giving Day, a huge fundraising opportunity each year for North Texas nonprofits. As they planned for this campaign, they wanted to give their audience a way to remove themselves from further communication about North Texas Giving Day if they weren't able to join this year. They wondered: If we allow individuals to 'opt-out' of a campaign, will the unsubscribe rate decrease? They created a treatment with one line of copy and a campaign 'Opt-out' link for viewers to click, and then they launched an A/B split test to find out.

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Not Valid How reduced copy and a more direct headline affect donor conversion

Date Added: September 10, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Name Acquisition Headline, Name Acquisition Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary offered a free online course called How to Read the Bible Like a Seminary Professor to allow their donors and prospects to experience the value proposition of the Seminary. Although they had a good donor conversion rate, they wanted to see if they could improve email acquisition by making the value proposition on the signup page more appealing. They created a treatment with a more direct headline: "Learn to read the Bible like never before". Then, they removed the bulleted list from the copy to reduce the overall length of the copy, hypothesizing that it was not core to the value proposition on the page. They split traffic to the page and launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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Not Valid How additional premium-focused value proposition affects conversion

Date Added: September 10, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Donation Page Design, Donation Page Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary had found a popular offer in their free Gospel of John course. After the user signed up, they were given the opportunity to make a gift.In exchange for a gift of $100 or more they were offered a commentary as the course companion book for the Gospel of John course. DTS decided to try to see if they could increase conversion rate by integrating review content for the commentary into the donation page. They pulled some reviews from a popular book review site onto the page, showed five stars, and gave a positive review for the commentary, hoping that this would increase conversion.

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Not Valid How a time-sensitive value proposition affects conversion rate for donors

Date Added: September 10, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Donation Page Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary was running a fundraising campaign for North Texas Giving Day.They had previously tested into a value proposition centered around their mission: growing the kingdom. However, they wanted to test to see if a very time-sensitive specific matching challenge ask would be a greater motivator for donors and nondonors. Since the two segments had different levels of affinity and motivation, they wanted to test them separately. They created a treatment page and showed it to both donors and nondonors independently, with a 50-50 split to try to determine which value proposition was a greater motivator for this specific campaign.

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Not Valid How a time-sensitive value proposition affects conversion rate for nondonors

Date Added: September 10, 2017 Research Partner: Dallas Theological Seminary Element tested: Donation Page Copy

Dallas Theological Seminary was running a fundraising campaign for North Texas Giving Day.They had previously tested into a value proposition centered around their mission: growing the kingdom. However, they wanted to test to see if a very time-sensitive specific matching challenge ask would be a greater motivator for donors and nondonors. Since the two segments had different levels of affinity and motivation, they wanted to test them separately. They created a treatment page and showed it to both donors and nondonors independently, with a 50-50 split to try to determine which value proposition was a greater motivator for this specific campaign.

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