110.4% lift How the type of ask in an appeal affects click rate

Date Added: October 24, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Email Call-to-Action

National Breast Cancer Foundation was sending an email appeal for BCAM, and wanted to test click-through rate on a direct ask call-to-action (give your gift here) vs. a soft ask (learn more about how you can help). The rest of the email remained the same on the control/treatment.

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14.3% lift How the value proposition on a website pop-up can impact clicks to a donation page.

Date Added: October 23, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Advertising

The month of October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This is a critical time of year for National Breast Cancer Foundation to raise money for their organization around awareness and education of breast cancer. They get a significant amount of traffic to their homepage during this month. They have a pop-up on the homepage that they display in an effort to convert the site traffic into donors. They tested the value proposition of this pop-up from something tangible (provide 1,000 more women with screen services) to a more general value proposition (help women facing breast cancer).

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100.0% lift How a soft ask in an email appeal can motivate more people to convert.

Date Added: October 20, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Email Copy, Email Call-to-Action

For National Breast Cancer Foundation's year-end campaign they sent a series of appeals. One of their appeals was focused on providing mammograms to women in need. They have found that it is difficult to get their email file to convert through email appeals. In an effort to optimize this challenge, they hypothesized that it might be better to use a soft ask as the call-to-action rather than a direct one. The control email said, "Here's a link where you can give." They developed a treatment that said, "Here's a link where you can learn more."

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100.0% lift How clarity in the call-to-action increases conversion rate

Date Added: May 24, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Name Acquisition Copy

National Breast Cancer Foundation was trying to increase conversions on the landing page of their 3 Steps to Early Detection guide. They ran a test to see if adding a specific call-to-action sentence ("Where can we send your guide?") above the form would increase conversions more than a form without specific direction to the downloader in the body copy. The rest of the elements on the page remained constant.

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-38.9% drop How value proposition focused copy in a Facebook ad can create fear and impact acquisition

Date Added: May 11, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Advertising

National Breast Cancer Foundation was running Facebook ads to promote their eBook, Healthy Living Guide. They wanted to test whether including a value prop on the image copy ("Find out if you're at risk for cancer") would increase conversions more than asking people to "Get the Guide." All other elements of the ad remained the same.

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44.7% lift How clarity in the headline of a Facebook ad trumps a persuasive headline

Date Added: May 10, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Advertising

National Breast Cancer Foundation was running Facebook ads to promote their new eBook, 3 Steps to Early Detection. They ran a test on the headline of the ad- The control ad included a value prop ("Detect Breast Cancer Earlier"), and the treatment simply asked people to "Get the Guide." All other elements of the ad remained the same.

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45.6% lift How appealing to the broader audience with ad copy impacts conversion

Date Added: March 29, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Advertising

National Breast Cancer Foundation developed an eBook that was designed to help people know if they were at risk for cancer and offered suggestions with how a person could even prevent cancer. They offered this resource to people through paid Facebook ads. They wanted to test the motivation of the end-user for getting the resource so they tested two different ads against each other. One ad said, "Ad Risk for Cancer? Find out." with a picture of the resource next to it. They tested this against another ad that said, "Get this free resource." with a picture of the resource next to it.

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Not Valid How adding images to a donation page can impact conversion

Date Added: February 10, 2017 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Donation Page Design

On the primary donation page for NBCF's year-end campaign, they wanted to see if they could increase donations by adding images to the page. The control donation page just had copy and the treatment they developed had three images added to the top page. They split the traffic coming to the page and tested.

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270.1% lift How first-name personalization affects email engagement

Date Added: November 28, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Email Copy

National Breast Cancer Foundation had a recommendation that they start including first and last names on their email capture forms. Since this would take some development work to update all of their forms, they wanted to see if it made a difference in email engagement.

They had enough names on their list who had first names (from other sources) that they were able to run a test on a post-campaign email. This email had two calls to action—a donation ask and a Facebook share link. They split the file between the emails that had no personalization and the emails that had personalization and measured the results.



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10.4% lift How increasing relevancy of the subject line affects open rate

Date Added: November 15, 2016 Research Partner: National Breast Cancer Foundation Element tested: Email Subject Line

National Breast Cancer Foundation send out a monthly newsletter to keep donors and supporters informed and engaged. They had traditionally used a functional subject line that clearly stated what the communication was—in this case, “October 2016 Newsletter | Helping Women Now”.

But they realized that the subject line is the initial point of interaction with their readers—and if they didn’t make it “open-worthy”, they might be causing some possible readers to delete it outright.

So they drafted a second subject line to give more insight into the communications and provide a greater incentive to open: “It's A Special Month...”.

They split their email file to determine a winner.



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