Not Valid How “minor mystery” language in a headline affects conversion

Date Added: February 6, 2018 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Donation Page Headline, Donation Page Copy

CaringBridge had run extensive testing on their "tribute widget", where the majority of donations on their site begin. They wanted to run a headline test, with the knowledge that such a slight change might not produce any noticeable effect. They wanted to test the angle of a "minor mystery", which had proven in other experiments to increase engagement (and subsequently conversion) by provoking the reader that they might not know something. The headline on the tribute widget asked a simple question: Can you help power [tribute name]'s site? They proposed a test to the headline to introduce the "minor mystery": Did you know you can help power [tribute name]'s site?

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19.7% lift How increasing personalization and aligning motivation with user intent affects engagement

Date Added: February 5, 2018 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Engagement

CaringBridge's marketing team sought to increase the amount of users who got to their "ways to help" page, where there were several options to deepen engagement and provide more support to their friend or family member. They thought that a slight copy change would align the "Ways to help" button on the journal page with the user's intent. Instead of "Ways to help", they proposed "Help [FirstName]" to encourage more people to click through. They thought this might work because they hypothesized that people who were reading this page were (consciously or unconsciously) desiring to help their friend or family member. They were concerned about possible reactions to this test, so they only included 10% of site traffic in the experiment.

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11.5% lift How arrangement of a donation ask affects donor conversion

Date Added: November 28, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Advertising

CaringBridge had redesigned their entire site experience to create a more streamlined “newsfeed” experience. As part of the design, their tribute widget (which accounts for a large portion of donations) was split horizontally to a two-column layout. They wondered how this affected the user’s ability to properly absorb the value proposition, and connect that to the clear next step—making a donation.

They decided to test a “stacked” tribute widget that took these two columns and aligned them vertically. They hypothesized that as the reader progressed through the copy, aligning the call-to-action as the clear next step would result in more conversions.



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-27.6% drop How increasing intensity of color on a widget affects clickthrough rate

Date Added: October 24, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Advertising

CaringBridge had long sought to increase clickthrough rate on their tribute widget, which started the gift process for . One of their designers hypothesized that the current tribute widget blended in too much with the rest of the site and needed some "pop". Using the intense CaringBridge brand purple, she created a treatment designed to attract more attention, and hopefully clickthrough rate. CaringBridge tested the new tribute widget in both desktop and mobile views and launched a test to determine a winner.

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34.3% lift How tangible donation language affects donor conversion

Date Added: September 5, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Advertising

CaringBridge had done some message development around the value proposition of a donation. Donations to CaringBridge help power a platform that helps people stay connected. Their value proposition centered around this connection, as multiple tests had proven. However, they hypothesized that adding a more tangible offer for the donor into the ask might increase conversion. They calculated that it takes $30 to power a single CaringBridge site for a month, and developed a treatment of their tribute widget (which appears on the most highly-trafficked sections of their site) that called this out. Then, they launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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Not Valid How emotion-driven copy affects landing page conversion

Date Added: September 5, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Donation Page Copy

CaringBridge had previously run an experiment on the journal pages of their site that produced a big lift  in revenue when "emotive" language was shown. They wanted to run an additional test to see if the same sort of emotive language would produce an increase in revenue on the tribute donation page. Since the the winning copy from the previous experiment wouldn't deploy for a few weeks, they had a chance to test the copy on the tribute page independently. They hypothesized that if they could also get a lift on the donation page, then they might be able to have a compound lift from the two areas of improvement. They created a treatment donation page that utilized the "love and support" language and launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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Not Valid How removing a gift array on mobile devices affects donor conversion

Date Added: August 24, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Donation Page Form

CaringBridge had seen a significant lift in donor conversion on one of their donation pages when they removed the gift array and simply offered an "open field" that allowed donors to pick their own donation amount. However, their donation page setup split out desktop pages and mobile pages, so they wanted to test the exact same premise on their mobile pages. They removed the array on a treatment page and left an open field, then launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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Not Valid How direct copy affects donation page conversion rate

Date Added: August 18, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Donation Page Headline, Donation Page Copy

CaringBridge's primary donation page had proven to show better results with a broader value proposition, as opposed to the highly personalized value proposition presented on their tribute donation pages. In a copy review of their tribute donation page, they wondered if the question posed in the headline: "What does CaringBridge mean to you?" added cognitive friction as people tried to answer this question for themselves, instead of continuing to ingest the value proposition. They created a treatment that instantly offered an opportunity to the reader—"You make CaringBridge better." The treatment copy removed questions and made statements, telling them that if they valued CaringBridge, their donation was vital. They launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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Not Valid How increasing perceived security on a donate button affects conversion

Date Added: August 15, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Donation Page Form

CaringBridge had performed extensive testing on their "tribute" donation form, which produced the majority of their online fundraising revenue. One experiment was able to increase the conversion rate on the page by increasing perceived security, adding a box around the credit card information. However, this box left the donate button outside of the box. Their team wondered if this was leaving conversions on the table due to the button being perceived as "insecure". They launched a version of the page that moved the donate button into the "secure box" and launched an A/B test to determine a winner.

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67.5% lift How different value propositions on an in-site donation ask affect revenue

Date Added: August 8, 2017 Research Partner: CaringBridge Element tested: Advertising

Although there was no difference in clickthrough rate, treatment 3 (with the emotional appeal) produced a 67% increase in revenue through a combination of an increase in conversion rate and a simultaneous increase in average gift. This shows that while the initial metric was not affected, those who chose to click on the third treatment had a much higher motivation to give, which resulted in more gifts at larger sizes.

Treatment 3 offered something that none of the other treatments did—a way to show love and support for the journal author. While the other three treatments showed ways that the user could support the site and connected the site’s impact with the author, the third treatment gave them a direct connection to the person they care for, and proposed a donation as the way to show love and support. This produced an opportunity to give that no other treatment could match.

This experiment prompts more testing around this language throughout the site, as well as testing around how to increase clickthrough rate on the donate box through accentuated placement and visual UI.



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